Foucault News

News and resources on French thinker Michel Foucault (1926-1984)

Johansen, M.B.
Fall of the public teacher – discourse of intimacy and the teaching profession in Denmark
(2014) Research Papers in Education, 23 p. Article in Press.

DOI: 10.1080/02671522.2014.989176

Abstract
This article reports on a case study conducted in a Danish municipality with 22 teachers as participants, in the context of a project focused on well-being and key educational competencies. The final aim was that of discovering how their ideal of the good teacher was verbalised. What is it that they thematise? How are thematisations created and maintained? The study is theoretically based on Richard Sennett’s notions on the private–public divide and Michel Foucault’s definitions of power and discourse. It focuses on the manners in which Danish teachers articulate a discourse in which words and phrases otherwise seen in connection with intimate relationships (close friends, sweethearts, parents and children) are prevalent. This shall be defined as a discourse of intimacy, the assumption being that this discourse has become the predominant way in which to talk about the good teacher. Furthermore, the article provides (a) a discussion about the ontology of intimacy; (b) a threefold typology of intimacy, namely confessional, emotional and relational, a categorisation that stems from the teachers’ statements and exchanges when discussing good performance; and (c) a reflection on the concept of mode of intimacy, used in this research to refer to the manner in which teachers put to practice their idea of the good teacher, which is mainly through praise and recognition.

Author Keywords
case study; discourse analysis; forms of intimacy; schoolteachers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: