Foucault News

News and resources on French thinker Michel Foucault (1926-1984)

Schliehe, A., Philo, C., Carlin, B., Fallon, C., Penna, G. Lockdown under lockdown? Pandemic, the carceral and COVID-19 in British prisons (2022) Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers DOI: 10.1111/tran.12557 Abstract The relationship between pandemic, or chronic infectious diseases, and the carceral, meaning set-apart spaces of enforced confinement for “wrong-doers,” has a long, tangled …

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Repo, J., Richter, H. An evental pandemic: thinking the COVID-19 ‘Event’ with Deleuze and Foucault (2022) Distinktion DOI: 10.1080/1600910X.2022.2086595 Abstract As COVID-19 swept the world it also became the subject of a quickly growing body of theoretical scholarship aimed at understanding the social, political and economic implications of the ‘pandemic event’. Taking a step back, …

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Tim Christiaens (2022) Biomedical technocracy, the networked public sphere and the biopolitics of COVID-19: notes on the Agamben affair, Culture, Theory and Critique, DOI: 10.1080/14735784.2022.2099919 ABSTRACT Giorgio Agamben’s public interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic against emergency measures like lockdowns, obligatory vaccinations and the prescribed use of masks have been highly controversial. I argue that Agamben’s …

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Special Issue – Call for papers: Biopolitical tensions after pandemic times, Foucault Studies PDF of call for papers Foucault Studies Special issue call for papers Biopolitical tensions after pandemic times Guest editors Annika Skoglund, Uppsala University Anindya Sekhar Purakayastha, Kazi Nazrul University and ILSR, Calcutta Fabiana Jardim, University of São Paulo David Armstrong, King’s College …

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Barry, L. Epidemic and Insurance: Two Forms of Solidarity (2022) Theory, Culture and Society DOI: 10.1177/02632764221087932 Abstract Despite their common core in statistics, insurance and epidemiology propel two different forms of solidarity. In insurance, the collective is a source of protection, thanks to the pooling of risks; in epidemics by contrast, the group remains the …

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Talcott, Samuel. 2022. “Vectors of Thought: François Delaporte, the Cholera of 1832 and the Problem of Error” Philosophies 7, no. 3: 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies7030056 Abstract This paper resists the virality of contemporary paranoia by turning to “French epistemology”, a philosophical ethos that embraces uncertainty and complexity by registering the transformative impact of scientific knowledge on thought. …

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Janaína Quinzen Willrich, Luciane Prado Kantorski, Ariane da Cruz Guedes, Carmen Terezinha Leal Argiles, Marta Solange Streicher, Janelli da Silva, Dariane Lima Portela, The (mis)government in the COVID-19 pandemic and the psychosocial implications: discipline, subjection, and subjectivity (2022) Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP. DOI: 10.1590/1980-220X-REEUSP-2021-0550 Abstract OBJECTIVE: to analyze the psychosocial implications arising …

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Francesca Peruzzo, Stephen J Ball, Emiliano Grimaldi, Peopling the crowded education state: Heterarchical spaces, EdTech markets and new modes of governing during the COVID-19 pandemic, International Journal of Educational Research, Volume 114, 2022 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijer.2022.102006 Abstract In this paper, we examine a set of complexly related education policy issues that concern changes to the form and …

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Han-yu Huang Risk, Fear and Immunity: Reinventing the Political in the Age of Biopolitics, Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 37.1 March 2011: 43-71 Abstract As an update of his continual concern for contemporary risk society since the 1980s, Ulrich Beck’s latest work World at Risk (2009) alerts us to the deterritorializing effects of global risk …

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Karmakar, G., Sarkar, J. Virus and Visible Reality: Biopolitics, Crime, and Disability in Peter May’s Lockdown (2021) NALANS: Journal of Narrative and Language Studies, 9 (18), pp. 306-323. Abstract This paper examines Peter May’s crime novel Lockdown (2020) to explain how a bioengineered virus cripples London and results in a crime, the denouement of which …

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