Foucault News

News and resources on French thinker Michel Foucault (1926-1984)

Weare, A.M., Walkner, T.J., Tully, M.
State of intervention: community stakeholder discourse on teen childbearing in Iowa
(2019) Critical Public Health, 29 (2), pp. 205-214.

DOI: 10.1080/09581596.2018.1440069

Abstract
The state of teen childbearing in Iowa (USA) is positioned by community leaders as a discursive battleground for intervention. In 2015 meetings with community stakeholders, participants framed ‘culture’ (which they defined as ethnicity and religion) as a barrier in decreasing the state’s teen pregnancy rate and increasing girls’ economic self-sufficiency. The childbearing teen body was, unsurprisingly, portrayed as a public health problem in need of organizational intervention. But how participants linked ‘culture’ to neoliberal ideals was surprising and specific. Utilizing McRobbie’s concept of the ‘real self’ and Foucault’s explication of governmentality, this study draws out the role of neoliberal self-sufficiency in grooming teens to perform adolescent femininity and self-govern. In doing so, it considers community stakeholders’ meaning-making processes. Findings show the interventionist discourse does more than attempt to prevent early pregnancy: it reinforces acceptable and unacceptable pregnant bodies and compels community leaders and practitioners to govern childbearing teen bodies in precise ways. © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Author Keywords
community; culture; girls; real me; Teen pregnancy

Index Keywords
adolescent, adult, article, female, femininity, first trimester pregnancy, girl, grooming, human, human experiment, Iowa, leadership, physician

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: